Boux, Holly Jeanine and Courtenay Daum. "Stuck Between a Rock and a Meth Cooking Husband: What Breaking Bad's Skyler White Teaches Us About How the War on Drugs and Public Antipathy Constrain Women of Circumstances' Choices." New Mexico Law Review, Spring 2015. Vol. 45(2): 567-610.

Available At: http://lawschool.unm.edu/nmlr/current-issue.php

Abstract:

This article examines the Skyler White character to highlight how sociocultural expectations, the War on Drugs, and public antipathy intersect to constrain the choices available to women of circumstance. Through their analysis, the authors reveal how women such as Skyler find their options sharply constrained by the complicated dynamics of three related institutions—the legal sys- tem (and its practices), the family (and its concomitant obligations), and society (and its prevailing cultural expectations about women). This article highlights how these constraints do not just emerge from a solitary character’s choices, but rather are reflective of and conditioned by broader societal beliefs about women’s roles as wives and mothers in patriarchal sociocultural institutions including the family and the legal system.

Press Coverage:

Late Night Live Radio Program and Podcast, hosted by Phillip Adams, "Breaking Bad and the Law." Episode aired June 11, 2015. Australian Broadcasting Corporation
Available At: http://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/latenightlive/breaking-bad-and-the-law/6516506

The Guardian, "What real lawyers think about Breaking Bad - and why it should be taught in class." By Anna Codrea-Rado. Published May 22, 2015.
Available At: http://www.theguardian.com/tv-and-radio/2015/may/22/what-real-lawyers-think-about-breaking-bad

Boux, Holly Jeanine and Courtenay Daum. "At the Intersection of Social Media and Rape Culture: How Facebook, Texting and Other Personal Communications Challenge the "Real" Rape Myth in the Criminal Justice System." University of Illinois Journal of Law, Technology & Policy, Spring 2015.

Available At: http://illinoisjltp.com/journal/current-issue

Abstract:

This article examines the involvement of smartphones and social media in the execution of sexual assaults when perpetrators and their peers document rapes via handheld technology and then share these depictions using this technology and social media platforms. Particular attention is focused on the how the interactions among communicative technologies, social media, and acts of rape provide an opening to undermine rape culture, including pervasive myths about what constitutes "real" rape, within the U.S. legal system. At the reporting stage, social media depictions and exchanges may provide sufficient evidence to challenge local “rape tolerance” and push legal actors to investigate and prosecute alleged cases of sexual assault and rape. Similarly, at trial this evidence may inform prosecutorial and judicial decisions as well as juror deliberations. At the same time as they create openings to challenge hegemonic rape culture as it exists within the legal system, these technologies create new outlets for victim blaming and may complicate discussions about female and male responsibility and sexuality, both in rape cases and society more broadly. Ultimately, while social media simultaneously challenges and reinforces rape culture across social and legal environments, this article concludes that social media evidence introduces opportunities for victims seeking redress through the criminal justice system to challenge the dominant rape narratives including the "real" rape and "she is lying" myths as they function in the legal system.

Boux, Holly Jeanine. "Towards a New Theory of Feminist Coalition: Accounting for the Heterogeneity of Gender, Race, Class and Sexuality through an Exploration of Power and Responsibility." Journal of Feminist Scholarship, Summer 2016. Issue 10.

Available At: Click Here to Download

Abstract:

This paper begins by outlining several key ways feminist coalition work has been addressed by both theorists and practitioners and discusses how accounting for the complex experiences of identities such as race, class, gender, and sexuality continues to complicate coalition-building and theorizing. Building upon a detailed exploration of the work of Kimberly Christensen and Patricia Hill Collins, I bring insights from outside feminist coalitional theory, in particular drawing on Guinier and Torres' work, into my synthesized theory of feminist coalition. In doing so, I develop a novel theory of feminist coalition that centers and redefines the concepts of power and responsibility. My key argument is that an explicit focus on power and responsibility can help us develop more functional answers to critical and still pressing questions such as: who is included – explicitly or implicitly – in feminist coalitions? And, what issues, or agendas, are we working towards changing through these coalitions?